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grenepages_Adeyinka Oresanya THE DAUGHTER’S INSPIRATION

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Adeyinka Oresanya is a passionate Christian novelist, whose love for the Lord, His word and writing has birthed more than ten short stories, including the popular The Struggling Virgin, and two novels. She is the editor of The Daughter's Inspirations Fiction Pamphlets for teens, which has blessed many readers. She is an avid reader and committed teenage teacher.
Visit her website at www.adeyinkaoresanya.com

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The Journey of Awelewa 10

Adeyinka Oresanya THE DAUGHTER’S INSPIRATION_The Journey of Awelewa 10Read the previous episodes here

It’s a work-free, owambe-free, quiet Saturday—a rare and wonderful time to relax and just SLEEP after a crazy week of attending to disgruntled customers—and I had spent the greater part of the day pacing my bedroom, trying to memorize the Bible passage for my poem rendition in church the next day. That was one of the beautiful activities we started at The Christian Liberty Centre, Bodija, to encourage us young people to be conversant with our Bible.

We had the freedom to choose any chapter we wanted as long as it hadn’t been rendered before. 0f all the passages in the Bible, your girl chose Psalms 107. You see, I just started attending CLC last year, and while I was active in the ushering subgroup, this would be the first time I would mount the altar for any presentation and I was so eager to do excellently. I should have known excellence came with a price. This is 4:15 P.M. and I had only been able to memorize 25 out of 43 verses.

I groaned. Holy Spirit I need your help!

I heard keys jingling and the front door creaking open. One of my flatmates had just arrived. My bedroom door burst open and Sara sashayed in, starry-eyed and smiling. It looked like my memorization would have to wait.

“Babe,” she said.

I raised my eyebrow. “What happened to knocking and waiting to be asked into other people’s rooms?”

Sara waved it off and flung herself on the bed. “That’s for strangers, not BFFs.”

“Whatever.” I flopped on the rug. “The way you are grinning, I take it your gig went well after all?”

Sara laughed deeply. “Awe, I’m glowing, I’m glowing and I know!” she sang.

I rolled my eyes. “Out with it already.”

Sara sat up. “I was making up the bride when this guy walked in. Awe, the room suddenly went silent. All our eyes went in the same direction. Girl, this guy is the walking definition of F-I-N-E.”

“Hmmm,” I replied.

“For real o. The bride was so excited and just flew into his arms with a scream. I couldn’t help staring, girl. The good thing is he met my eyes back, of all the girls in the room, and stared for some seconds before Kiitan introduced him as her brother, Ifetokunbo. Apparently he just flew in from the UK for the wedding.”

“Ehn ehn?” I intoned. “So she’s Kiitan now, I thought her name was Cold Eyes.” I teased, referring to the nickname she gave the bride because of her aloofness during the trial session.

“Forget that jo,” she pouted. “Kiitan is just being her. In fact, I think she was stressed up and missing her Bro because she lighted up and stayed in good mood throughout after he showed up.”

I raised my eyebrow. “Mm-hmm.”

She clucked her tongue. “Na you sabi. You haven’t heard the best part yet.”

I nodded.

“I was packing up my stuff at the changing room after the reception when Ifetokunbo came in, complimented my job on his sister and asked for my comp card,” she smiled, “We exchanged numbers and he promised to get in touch.”

“Hmmm,” was all I could say.

She swayed her body from side to side. “Awe, this is the real deal. I can feel it deep inside.”

I chuckled. “Feyisara! How sure are you about that? You just met him.”

“Seriously, I just know deep inside. I feel this—” Her phone began to ring and she leaned to take it out from her purse. Her hand flew to her mouth. “Oh my God, oh my God! He is calling already.”

I just continued to stare at her.

She jumped up. “Awe, I have to take this….in my room.”

I nodded.

“Hello,” My friend’s accent instantly changed to a foreign one.

I rolled my eyes.

“Be careful,” I mouthed at her and she winked as she walked out of my room.

Feyisara.

The rate at which she “fell” in love at first sight never ceased to amaze me. After the saga with Bukunmi, I was sure that would never happen to me again. Love at first sight was good in movies and books, but in real life? Nah. Too risky.

I thought of my friend as I lay on the bed, and I shook my head. I couldn’t understand why a girl would be looking everywhere for love when it was sitting right in front of her, waiting to be acknowledged.

Wale was a wedding photographer and media consultant Feyisara had introduced to me at The Eventmakers Conference I accompanied her to last October. He was the most responsible guy I had ever seen with Feyisara since we became friends. And a real Christian, too, which was rare these days.

Still, Feyisara always insisted they were friends and could only remain best of friends, but I saw how this guy acted around her, they were actions of a guy in love, yet Sara had never seen it and I didn’t think she would, not with all these hot guys she was chasing around.

I sighed.

Pray for her, I heard the Holy Spirit say to me.

I would definitely pray for her. Later. When I was done memorizing my poem for tomorrow.

I yawned.


…to be continued.

This story or any of its series may not be copied, reproduced or transmitted without acknowledgement of the original author—Oresanya Adeyinka J. Thank you for respecting the author’s work. 

This story is purely a work of fiction. Names, characters, places and incidents are the products of the author’s imagination or are used fictitiously. Any resemblance to actual events, localities, organisations or persons, living or dead, is entirely coincidental and beyond the intent of the author.

 

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Read the latest from Adeyinka Oresanya THE DAUGHTER’S INSPIRATION blog

Adeyinka Oresanya THE DAUGHTER’S INSPIRATION Adeyinka Oresanya THE DAUGHTER’S INSPIRATION

Read the latest from Adeyinka Oresanya THE DAUGHTER’S INSPIRATION blog

Adeyinka Oresanya THE DAUGHTER’S INSPIRATION Adeyinka Oresanya THE DAUGHTER’S INSPIRATION

Read the latest from Adeyinka Oresanya THE DAUGHTER’S INSPIRATION blog

Adeyinka Oresanya THE DAUGHTER’S INSPIRATION Adeyinka Oresanya THE DAUGHTER’S INSPIRATION

 

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